de la politique

eighteen, feminist. this blog will focus on whatever political/social issue I desire

this blog is also everyone friendly.

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“Being a leftist is a calling, not a career; it’s a vocation, not a profession. It means you are concerned about structural violence, you are concerned about exploitation at the work place, you are concerned about institutionalized contempt against gay brothers and lesbian sisters, hatred against peoples of color, and the subordination of women. It means that you are willing to fight against, and to try to understand the sources of social misery at the structural and institutional levels, as well as at the existential and personal levels. That’s what it means to be a leftist; that’s why we choose to be certain kinds of human beings.”
- Cornel West

“Being a leftist is a calling, not a career; it’s a vocation, not a profession. It means you are concerned about structural violence, you are concerned about exploitation at the work place, you are concerned about institutionalized contempt against gay brothers and lesbian sisters, hatred against peoples of color, and the subordination of women. It means that you are willing to fight against, and to try to understand the sources of social misery at the structural and institutional levels, as well as at the existential and personal levels. That’s what it means to be a leftist; that’s why we choose to be certain kinds of human beings.”

- Cornel West

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womenaresociety:

Where Abortion Rights Are Disappearing
Thirty-eight years after Roe v. Wade recognized a woman’s right to make her own childbearing decisions and legalized abortion nationwide, a newly intensified drive by anti-abortion forces who refuse to accept the law of the land has seriously imperiled women’s ability to exercise that right. Opponents of abortion rights know they cannot achieve their ultimate goal of an outright ban, at least in the near future. So they are concentrating on enacting laws and regulations narrowing the legal right and making abortion more difficult to obtain.
 
The most visible battleground is Congress, where the House Republican majority seems to have time for a big-government attack on women’s reproductive health and freedom but not to pass a job-creating bill.
However, as in the past, most of the fights are taking place in state capitals. The result has been a huge number of new abortion restrictions, traceable in part to the 2010 mid-term elections, which increased the number of anti-abortion governors and state legislatures controlled by abortion opponents, who keep concocting new schemes to make terminating a pregnancy a right on paper only. The spate of new laws comes on top of many state and federal abortion curbs already in place.
The map illustrates the barriers, state by state, facing women needing access to a constitutionally protected medical procedure. States shown in the darkest shade have enacted five of the most harmful restrictions: mandatory waiting periods; demeaning “counseling” sessions lacking a real medical justification; parental consent or notification laws that pose a particular hardship for teenagers from troubled homes, including incest victims; needlessly onerous clinic “safety” rules governing such things as the width of hallways and the amount of storage space for janitorial supplies; and prohibitions on abortion coverage in insurance policies. States in lighter shades have fewer of these restrictions. Twenty-seven states have enacted three or more of these laws, while only 12 states, shown in white, have none.
The graphic traces the total number of a broad range of major abortion restrictions enacted by the states, including the five covered in the map and others, like mandatory ultrasounds. Sixty-one such laws were enacted during just the first eight months of this year — nearly triple the number in all of 2010, and more than double the previous record of 28 set in 1997. Although some of this year’s statutes have already been preliminarily enjoined by courts as unconstitutional, others will be left to stand as constraints on women’s reproductive freedom.
If anything, the chart understates the limits on access to abortion. It fails to capture other negative developments, like the big decline in the number of abortion providers. In 1982, there were 2,908 providers nationwide. As of 2008, there were only 1,793. In 97 percent of the counties that are outside metropolitan areas there are no abortion providers at all.
  
One powerful strategy of the anti-abortion forces has been to portray abortion as outside the mainstream and cast women who have abortions as immoral outliers. In reality, abortion is one of the safest and most common of medical procedures, one that about one-third of American women undergo during their lifetime.
One clear lesson of this year’s skyrocketing number of new state laws is that those who care about keeping the procedure safe, legal and accessible need to raise their voices as loudly and effectively as those on the other side. If they don’t do so, and quickly, the number of harmful restrictions will continue to balloon, at a rising cost to women’s lives, health and equality. 

womenaresociety:

Where Abortion Rights Are Disappearing

Thirty-eight years after Roe v. Wade recognized a woman’s right to make her own childbearing decisions and legalized abortion nationwide, a newly intensified drive by anti-abortion forces who refuse to accept the law of the land has seriously imperiled women’s ability to exercise that right. Opponents of abortion rights know they cannot achieve their ultimate goal of an outright ban, at least in the near future. So they are concentrating on enacting laws and regulations narrowing the legal right and making abortion more difficult to obtain.

The most visible battleground is Congress, where the House Republican majority seems to have time for a big-government attack on women’s reproductive health and freedom but not to pass a job-creating bill.

However, as in the past, most of the fights are taking place in state capitals. The result has been a huge number of new abortion restrictions, traceable in part to the 2010 mid-term elections, which increased the number of anti-abortion governors and state legislatures controlled by abortion opponents, who keep concocting new schemes to make terminating a pregnancy a right on paper only. The spate of new laws comes on top of many state and federal abortion curbs already in place.

The map illustrates the barriers, state by state, facing women needing access to a constitutionally protected medical procedure. States shown in the darkest shade have enacted five of the most harmful restrictions: mandatory waiting periods; demeaning “counseling” sessions lacking a real medical justification; parental consent or notification laws that pose a particular hardship for teenagers from troubled homes, including incest victims; needlessly onerous clinic “safety” rules governing such things as the width of hallways and the amount of storage space for janitorial supplies; and prohibitions on abortion coverage in insurance policies. States in lighter shades have fewer of these restrictions. Twenty-seven states have enacted three or more of these laws, while only 12 states, shown in white, have none.

The graphic traces the total number of a broad range of major abortion restrictions enacted by the states, including the five covered in the map and others, like mandatory ultrasounds. Sixty-one such laws were enacted during just the first eight months of this year — nearly triple the number in all of 2010, and more than double the previous record of 28 set in 1997. Although some of this year’s statutes have already been preliminarily enjoined by courts as unconstitutional, others will be left to stand as constraints on women’s reproductive freedom.

If anything, the chart understates the limits on access to abortion. It fails to capture other negative developments, like the big decline in the number of abortion providers. In 1982, there were 2,908 providers nationwide. As of 2008, there were only 1,793. In 97 percent of the counties that are outside metropolitan areas there are no abortion providers at all.

 

One powerful strategy of the anti-abortion forces has been to portray abortion as outside the mainstream and cast women who have abortions as immoral outliers. In reality, abortion is one of the safest and most common of medical procedures, one that about one-third of American women undergo during their lifetime.

One clear lesson of this year’s skyrocketing number of new state laws is that those who care about keeping the procedure safe, legal and accessible need to raise their voices as loudly and effectively as those on the other side. If they don’t do so, and quickly, the number of harmful restrictions will continue to balloon, at a rising cost to women’s lives, health and equality. 

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Caring about women doesn’t make me a man-hater. Caring about the rights and welfare of minorities doesn’t mean I don’t care about the rights and welfare of the majority. Caring about immigrants doesn’t mean I don’t care about citizens already here. Caring about the underprivileged doesn’t mean I hate the privileged.

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I agree with this, but only to a point. Honestly, if you go out with 90% of your body uncovered, you’re kind of asking for it. Is that to say that it is deserved, or right if someone harasses you? No, not at all, but you’re still part of the problem. Everybody needs to be accountable for themselves. Women shouldn’t dress like whores, and guys shouldn’t be pervs, and yet often both are. The consumption of alcohol doesn’t help matters here, on either side. Both need to change, not just one, not just the other. Women need to stop playing the victim in everything, it’s the one part of the feminist movement that pisses me off to no end. You are just as accountable as a guy, for the same reason a guy is just as accountable as you.

Response of the day. (via marxisforbros)

but you’re missing the big picture

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Norway’s Prime Minister is a liberal atheist, they have one of the best economies in the world, they have universal health care, and subsidized education, it has had the highest Human Development Index 7 years in a row, and it’s never started a pointless war, given tax breaks to the richest, and created Jersey Shore — yet it’s America that knows best.

Matthew Trevithick, responding to this story, “Former Bush Official Places Blame For Oslo Attack On Norwegians For Not Being ‘Serious’ About Terrorism,” with a comment that wins the universe. (via marxisforbros) +
norwayhugger:

awesomebrainpowers:

This is how Norwegians respond to their worst terrorist attack ever: resisting the reflex to heighten security and calling on famous satirists to mock the attacker’s agenda.
Damn, Norway, you so cool and level-headed.

Exactly.
Norway is gaining so much respect right now.

norwayhugger:

awesomebrainpowers:

This is how Norwegians respond to their worst terrorist attack ever: resisting the reflex to heighten security and calling on famous satirists to mock the attacker’s agenda.

Damn, Norway, you so cool and level-headed.

Exactly.

Norway is gaining so much respect right now.

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brooklynmutt:

“One of the questions the Republican Party is gonna have to ask itself is: can they say yes to anything? Can they say yes to anything?” - President Obama

brooklynmutt:

“One of the questions the Republican Party is gonna have to ask itself is: can they say yes to anything? Can they say yes to anything?” - President Obama

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life:

In late July 2011, the United Nations declared the ongoing famine the worst in 20 years. Some 11.5 million people have been affected by drought in the region, but the 270-percent inflation rate in Somalia has made it financially impossible for companies to import food and make a profit. Two regions of southern Somalia especially hard can claim a malnutrition rate of 50 percent, with 10,000 dying each day of hunger. And the famine’s effects have spread to neighboring countries. In Dadaab, Kenya, a refugee camp meant for up to 90,000 Somalis fleeing the famine has growing into the largest refugee camp in the world, at four times that population.
see more — Famine in Somalia

life:

In late July 2011, the United Nations declared the ongoing famine the worst in 20 years. Some 11.5 million people have been affected by drought in the region, but the 270-percent inflation rate in Somalia has made it financially impossible for companies to import food and make a profit. Two regions of southern Somalia especially hard can claim a malnutrition rate of 50 percent, with 10,000 dying each day of hunger. And the famine’s effects have spread to neighboring countries. In Dadaab, Kenya, a refugee camp meant for up to 90,000 Somalis fleeing the famine has growing into the largest refugee camp in the world, at four times that population.

see more Famine in Somalia

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megadelicious:

murphmanfa:

sirmitchell:

We will most likely be cancelling our Netflix account. I’m not against raising prices, but I am against a 100% increase overnight. 

…except it doesn’t go into effect until September.

for me it’s almost a 100% increase which is completely ridiculous. 

a lot of people are looking to switch over to the streaming service because it’s cheaper and thats exactly what netflix wants. netflix announced their plans a couple of months ago that ultimately they wanted to only offer streaming but they were faced with a lot of protests from consumers. now they’re offering both options but at a steep rate, while making the one thats appealing to  the company, cheaper. it’s just business. 

megadelicious:

murphmanfa:

sirmitchell:

We will most likely be cancelling our Netflix account. I’m not against raising prices, but I am against a 100% increase overnight. 

…except it doesn’t go into effect until September.

for me it’s almost a 100% increase which is completely ridiculous. 

a lot of people are looking to switch over to the streaming service because it’s cheaper and thats exactly what netflix wants. netflix announced their plans a couple of months ago that ultimately they wanted to only offer streaming but they were faced with a lot of protests from consumers. now they’re offering both options but at a steep rate, while making the one thats appealing to  the company, cheaper. it’s just business. 

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whatsajuthika:

nines19:

cobracunt:

thefremen:

Literally, IRL.: Slut shaming is not an issue

doctorsage:

feministdykeslut:

doctorsage:

I mean come on. They’re sluts. Slut is an insult to begin with.

Being a slut is bad. I don’t get why this is so hard to comprehend.

slut shaming IS an issue.

it’s part of rape culture. it contributes to the idea that girls can somehow ask for being…

If you sleep around a lot, then that runs the risk of getting STDs or an unwanted pregnancy.

Ergo, being a slut is bad.

So in your little world it’s only bad for women to have sex because they are the only people who get STDs or pregnant because your definition is “a person with a vagina and working uterus” and in your world there is no such thing as prophylactics or birth control. 

You have absolutely no right to assign value to choices other people make when they have absolutely zero impact on you. 

Fun fact: I’ve been called a slut because I’m pretty comfortable for wanting to talk about masturbation in public. Yeah. :| People call people (particularly women) sluts for really arbitrary reasons beyond STDs and pregnancy, juuuuust saying.

And actually, being promiscuous (“sleeping around a lot”) does NOT increase the chances of contracting an STI or becoming or getting someone pregnant. Having unprotected sex does that.

I really, REALLY hate that people seem to believe that anyone who sleeps with more than one person is incapable of using protection. Seriously, what the fuck is up with that stereotype?

there is something called birth control and condoms. besides, what number of sexual partners is acceptable? is there a specific number you can’t go through?

slut-shaming is a shitty way to make fun of people who happen to express their sexuality. that’s all.

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